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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
. ♪ >>> welcome back to a special edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington: the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton continuing our special coverage live from the lincoln memorial on the national mall. 50 years ago, the eyes of the nation were on this spot where hundreds of thousands of people converged on history. people of all races from all walks of life joining hands in the name of justice and civil rights. in this hour, we'll hear from some of the people who traveled so far to attend this march. including the young girl shown in this iconic photo. i'll talk to her now 50 years later about how the march changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. an
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
to this country. have done great damage to the american culture. to the american psyche. >> washington doesn't want to find a -- 1/6 of the economy is gone. the government took it. i don't think the rest of the world is enamored with obama. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh on the record. and you hear rush say things you never heard him say before. but first, in our one-on-one interview, rush limbaugh tells us what he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals, president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you thinkhe says they're phony? because he believes it or is there a strategy? >> there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama i playfully call it the regime as i know it irritates him. it is much like a regime. i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy. have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
, the struggles of yesterday, and as we're approaching the an vary of the march on washington we have to wonder if the goals of the march on washington were met over the past 50 years. the answer to that is no, they were not. we need people not only as young as my grandchildren, they're great kids, weren't they? not only kids as young as my grandchildren, but people as old as you and i are. we need to put our shoulders to the wheel, ge make sure the figt gets done. >> michael: i don't know what you meant by people as old as you and i, but thank you for coming. i really appreciate it. >>> i'm looking at you, john boehner, politicians are on summer break, and what better place than des moines, really? donnie fowler and my good friend ben mankiewicz will collectively shape their views on that with me. they'll also share them. and ro khama getting ready for the silicon valley house seat. and whether vacationing or campaigning, a book that every lawmaker should have on their summer reading list, a dream foreclosed. i'll talk to the author about the people she met and the courageous action they have
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
. two firefighters and one civilian have been injured in those fires. >>> turning to washington and the snub heard around the world. president obama abruptly canceling next month's planned meet with russian president vladimir putin. while it's not a complete return to the cold war, there is a chill in the air between the u.s. and russia. nbc's trace iie potts joins me m washington. the president's snub has many wondering, what happens now? >> reporter: next, betty, we wait to see what russia's response is. we'll have two officials right here in washington tomorrow. we'll monitor that for you. here on capitol hill, democrats and republicans are supporting the president's decision. >> and the first impression they get -- >> reporter: secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary chuck hagel are still set to meet their russian counterparts in washington tomorrow. even though president obama canceled his moscow summit with russian president vladimir putin. >> we were not at the point in our progress on a number of these issues where a summit at the presidential level was the m
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> an
. washington doesn't want to find the waste and fraud. 1/6 of the economy is gone. government just took it. i don't think that the rest of the world is enommored of obama. if you read the foreign press, you get the truth. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh oont road and you hear rush say things he's never said before but first in our one-on-one interview rush limbaugh tells what is he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals. president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you think he says they are phony, because he believes it, or is there a strategy? >> no, there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama, you know, i playfully call it the regime, because i know it irritates them, and it is. it's like a regime, and i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy, have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there i
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
to go down fighting. >>> also said founder of amazon to buy "the washington post." what does that mean for the floundering legacy of the paper? the panel will weigh in on that. yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues... with three strains of good bacteria. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity. there's a new way to fight litter box odor. introducing tidy cats with glade tough odor solutions. two trusted names, one amazing product. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfectly fresh. tonight i'm using the just the two of us setting. electrolux. be even more amazing. see the electrolux kitchen and laundry appliance collection at the home depot today. >>
". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voic
would precipitate another crisis here in washington that no economist thinks is a good idea-- i'm assuming that they will not take that... that path. i have confidence that common sense in the end will prevail. >> woodruff: the president also fielded questions on his upcoming decision to appoint a new federal reserve chairman this fall, saying it was one of the most important decisions that remained in his presidency. and he also urged house republicans to move forward with an immigration reform bill once members return from their summer recess. >> brown: later in the program we'll have david brooks and ruth marcus respond to what the president said. between now and then: the u.s. and russia try to warm their frosty relationship; detroit struggles after declaring bankruptcy; brooks and marcus on the week's news and goats in the graveyard. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: american government personnel left lahore, pakistan today because of a specific threat to the consulate there. the u.s. shifted non-essential staff from lahore to the capita
of freedom. we will talk about who he was as we move in on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, which he organized. ♪ [music break] >> this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. white house has announced it will posthumously award the highest civilian honor in the united states come the presidential medal of freedom, to civil rights activist bayard rustin. obama will award him and 16 others at the white house later this year. in his own day, bayard rustin was a minority within the minority who tirelessly agitated for change. , awas an african-american gay man fighting against homophobia, and a pacifist fighting against endless war. he was a key advisor to martin luther king and introduced him to teachings of gondi and nonviolence. he helped to found the southern leadership conference. he was later the chief organizer of the historic march on washington for jobs and freedom, rallying hundreds of thousands of people for economic justice, full employment voting rights, and people opportunity. >> segregation shall be ended in every distri
anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom. in 1963, more than 200,000 people of all ages, races, sexes, and sexual orientations gathered here peacefully, or, orderly, as the press reported it back then, right where i'm sitting today. i'm honored to be joined by this afternoon by some of the people who helped make that an historic day, as well as some of the people who continued dr. king's work, as we honor the past and we look forward. but first, a look at the present. one of those continuing dr. king's work is his son, dr. martin luther king iii, reflecting earlier on how much work we still have to do to achieve his father's vision from 50 years ago. let's take a listen. >> the vision preached by my father a half century ago was that his four little children would one day live in a nation where they would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. however, sadly, the tears of trayvon martin's mother and father remind us that far too frequently, the color of one's skin remains a license to profile, to arrest, and to even murder with n
. remain locked up. let's start with our new details out of washington now. emily schmidt is more with more on this. what have what have we learned with what precipitated the embassy closers? >> we have no information. barbara starr report that is an intercepted message of senior al qaeda operatives within the last few days really caused the concern. cnn agreed to a request from an obama administration official not to go in to details about the message all because of its sensitivity. we know that this message was a critical factor leading to the shut-down and not the only factor. several u.s. officials said they have seen an increase of threats of yemen for weeks. there have been some major prison breaks in the region that was affected, leaving al qaeda members who were behind bars unaccounted for. regardless, this was an unprecedented move. we saw something we don't always see in washington -- agreement between democrats and republicans saying they think the administration did the right thing shutting down the 2 2 embassies and consulates. president obama is celebrating his birthday at cam
/11. after the bell stunner, jeff bezos buys "the washington post" for $250 bucks. and the bankrupt city of detroit starts the process of putting its priceless museum artwork up for auction. you wouldn't believe how much it could be worth. all those stories and much more coming up on the "kudlow report" right now. good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is the "kudlow report." first up tonight, breaking news, jeff bezos paying $250 million for "the washington post" newspaper. a few days ago boston red sox owner john henry bought the "boston globe" for the bargain basement price of only $70 million. what is going on here? why will these foes succeed while others have failed. joining us is our own julia boorstin. why will they succeed where others have failed in. >> i think the question is how do you define success? one thing jeff bezos makes very clear in his letter about this and it was also in the press release is that he's not investing this just as a financial endeavor but he sees this as supporting journalism. he says "i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c. an
-run business, the grahams are selling "the washington post" to amazon's ceo jeff bezos seen here deal making at a media summit last month in sun valley. but can the king of dotcom save print? >> we knew we could keep the "post" alive. we knew it could survive. but our aspirations for the "post" have always been higher by that. >> this is going to shake things up. >>> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. nearly 100 u.s. government personnel flew out of yemen today on a c-17 air force cargo plane. leaving only a kel stal emergenskeletal emergency staff behind because of what the state department is calling the extremely high threat level. th all of this comes after the interception of al qaeda communications threatening major attacks on u.s. interests. joining me now from new york, nbc's ama, but richard, first to you. you just finished interviewing john mccain there in cairo. what is he saying about the situation in egypt and the threat level in neighboring yemen? >> reporter: i just left the senator a couple of minutes ago. i was afraid i wasn't going to get to your show in time. he
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
indicate military attacks are coming. >>> anniversary of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. how president obama handles the hopes of the joshua generation. >>> plus as debt and a sense of despair looms large over motown, detroit's next mayor will be former hospital chief mike duggin or the man we'll meet this morning, wayne county sheriff benny napoleon. august 27th, this is "the daily rundown." lets get to my first reads of the morning. secretary of state john kerry laid out an aggressive case for intervention in syria arking evidence of the largest chemical attack in decades is undeniable. the latest escalation with a steady drum beat by the united states and its allies, which is clearly a leadup to military action. >> the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. president obama has made clear to the outside regime that this international norm cannot be violated without consequences. >> it's an important phrase. you heard it a lot, not just from john kerry but jay carney, international norm, significant, ready for str
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
troops to general washington. there is no doubt this was a massive setback for the british war effort. but the fact remains that even surrendering 7000 troops to washington, the british still and tens of thousands of more troops in north america and they could have somebody tens of thousands of more troops from other parts of the empir empiref they had decided to do so. but they were not able to do so because of the power of a new force in insurgent warfare, a term that was only going to faithfully in 1776, the power of public opinion. now, if the founding fathers had been battling the roman empire i can assure you that the romans, no matter how many battlefield defeats they would've suffered, would have come back and george washington, the founders, would have been crucified quite literally. the fact that this did not happen is because of what happened in an institution that the roamers did not have to worry about, at least not after the rise of the empire. and that was the house of commons, parliament. in 1782, a year, in the year after the battle of yorktown it was a very close vot
. grew up in washington, d c -- d.c. she knew dolley madison when she was a little girl. they went to st. john's church on lafayette square. when she was 5-10 years old, she knew dolly madison. her father was a very famous naval commandants who took a ship on a commercial ship that went down. it was an act of bravery because he made sure that all the passengers on board got off a first. his widow and his daughter, their only child, then living in new york city were given all sorts of awards, a monument to him at annapolis naval academy. alan arthur is really interesting. she does not become first lady, but she influences the administration. very similar to racial jackson jacksonl the way that she was the ghost, the memory of her. chester arthur made several appointments, four we know of, specifically of people who had known his wife. one was a cousin in the office of the attorney general made assistant attorney general. another was in the treasury. it was very controversial that he named the superintendent of the naval academy, he appointed a friend of theirs, a childhood friend of his w
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
washington post," the paper battles falling circulation. what does this mean for the business of media? more analysis with bertha coombs from the states. and also, we take the pulse of the solar industry with edward guinness, ceo of guinness alternative energy fund. got any thoughts or comments, please e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. we kick off in the corporate sector. a bit of a sell-off for want of a spin-off. sony shares dropping more than 5% after the japanese firm rejected investor dan loeb's plan to spin off part of its entertainment arm. some losses after the hedge fund said it would keep talking with sony to find more shareholder value. in a letter to third point, the ceo defended keeping full control of the entertainment unit, saying it helped to drive synergies. sony agreed to sharpen its earnings picture when it comes to disclosing movie and music revenues. you said they wouldn't really bend to dan loeb's influence. where does this leave him now? >> well, i think the fact of the matter is that if there is more recognition about the fact that the japanese companies move a lot more
, nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> she's amazing. msnbc contributor mike barnicle. and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the -- >> amazon -- >> newly sold "washington post," wow, big news there, in your world, gene. we'll talk about that. >> no free shipping for you, mika. >> he's like the free shipping czar now. >> my goodness. none for me. >> all right. mike barnicle, this is like a big day -- >> mike, this is huge. >> this is. >> this is -- >> i was surprised. >> as willie was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world and then we had a couple smokes and watched old reruns of "night of a thousand". >> you ran out of cigarettes before i got there. >> one pack talking about the globe, another pack -- >> the sale of the post as i'm sure gene will have more to say on this, it was stunning. >> it's an earthquake. >> stunning. >> but no family, few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family and i choose to think donnie graham and the waymouth aspe
you'll heard a lot about martin luther king's march on washington, but did you know the full name of the historic event 50 years ago was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. are we better off today than we were back then? some shocking stats for you upon my return. >> thousands of people gathered in washington to celebrate the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's i have a "dream" speech and the march on washington you may not know that the title of the event was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. the fact is dr. king was as focused on economic equality as he was on civil rights. in the last year of his life he launched what is called "the poor people's's "campaign" aimed as helping poor people groups. >> reporter: according to historians reverend martin luther king was very concerned that the economic gap between races could derail his civil rights movement with poverty and income disparities being the ultimate segregator. >> in 1968 he pivoted all of his attention on what was called the poor people's campaign. he was killed before his first march. >> repor
's march on washington, but did you know the full name of the historic event 50 years ago was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. are we better off today than we were back then? some shocking stats for you upon my return. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me t
electric grid. then a look at a recent survey on american's view on aging. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioned by the national captioning institute -www.ncicap.org--] ♪ host: one of the more news headlines this friday morning said the u.s. is treading lightly as the prices deepens in egypt. this has nearly 600 people have been killed amid what are being described as ferocious clashes between protestors and security forces. and another headline says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed today. to the question that's out there. should the u.s. cut off foreign aid to egypt. a lot of folks are saying that but so far, it hasn't happened. what do you think? call numbers on your screen. or you can put your voice on the program via twitter, facebook and send us an maul -- -- e-mail theere is the front page of "wall street journal" today. the lead headlines says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed. there is a photo of egyptian soldiers guarding an area around a
from washington with a preview. what about these new proposals do we expect to hear from the president? >> we expect him to talk about saving money. the real focus is going to be the middle class. and part of that is going to be restructuring how we do mortgages, trying to prevent the collapse of a freddie mac and fannie mae that we saw over the last several years and putting a lot more private money behind mortgages. he's also going to talk about the white house says saving $3,000 per family by making it easier to get mortgages and easier to refinance. for example, wiping out closing costs. if you re-fi to a lower term. what's significant here is where he's saying it. going back to arizona where he first addressed this issue four years ago. >> thank you. >>> and now here is your first look at this morning's dish of scrambled politics. here's something you don't hear every day. a politician being open about their future plans. wendy davis did that monday while addressing the national press club. >> i can say with absolute certainty that i will run for two offices. either the state sena
on that belief. >> and joining me now is washington post columnist eugene robins robinson, clip matthews, and nathan conley. we also have standing by ron allen at the lincoln memorial. chris and eugene, we're waiting to alert our audience of the founder and president of the children's defense fund. she served as council for mlk's poor people campaign. she will be speaking shortly. the anticipation is growing to the president's remarks. >> yes, i think we've heard a lot of great oratory today, but the concrete news story for tomorrow morning's papers and tonight on the nightly news is going to have to come from the president. he is really being set up here, if you will, to deliver something concrete. now, i really think it's important that he do that on the issue of jobs because this was, of course, a commemoration today and has been of the campaign for jobs back 50 years ago that martin luther king led. jobs. i think that's how the standard is going to be set for his speech tonight. will he promise something really, really big that the republicans will have a hard time saying no to? or w
in washington? how do you get these parties to work together -- together? we have not had enough gridlock. we need more gridlock. if they were passing the right things, which would mean that there would be a limitation on only be, they would allowed to improve our country by the repealing of laws -- then you don't one gridlock. let them start repealing. the gridlock is a natural consequence of a system that has failed. i think that is what the youth have recognized, but the system has not worked in the political system is a real mess. they're not willing to face up to the truth. they're not willing to face the truth. when you have the truth, they accuse the person telling the truth as a man committing treason. this is what you should be most concerned about. getting the truth about our government and making sure our government pro ovacy there is been a lot of moveon in local government and state and federal government. cameras are everywhere. -- and if they can spy on everything without a camera. does that mean we should be against cameras? no. but we should be against the government having t
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
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